Awaiti, Waihou Valley. 2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5.  1020 x 1100mm

Awaiti, Waihou Valley.

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5.  1020 x 1100mm

Stopbank, Waihou Valley 2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5.   820x 1142mm

Stopbank, Waihou Valley

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5.   820x 1142mm

Waihou River Mouth Diptych  2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5. 600 x 787 each

Waihou River Mouth

Diptych  2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5. 600 x 787 each

Rangiora Road, Waihou Valley  2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5 900 x 1114mm

Rangiora Road, Waihou Valley 

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5

900 x 1114mm

"Near this spot Capt Cook landed on the banks of the river he named the Thames. 20th Nov 1769". Waihou River 2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5.  850 x 680mm

"Near this spot Capt Cook landed on the banks of the river he named the Thames. 20th Nov 1769". Waihou River

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5.  850 x 680mm

Old Netherton Road, Waihou Valley 2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5.  850 x 680mm

Old Netherton Road, Waihou Valley

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5.  850 x 680mm

Kahikatea (Standing) 2017 Giclee photograph on satin photo rag Ed of 5. 600 x 899mm

Kahikatea (Standing)

2017

Giclee photograph on satin photo rag

Ed of 5.

600 x 899mm

Kahikatea (Study) 2017 Giclee photograph on satin photo rag Ed of 5. 600 x 899mm

Kahikatea (Study)

2017

Giclee photograph on satin photo rag

Ed of 5.

600 x 899mm

Kahikatea (Reflecting) 2017 Giclee photograph on satin photo rag Ed of 5.   600 x 899mm

Kahikatea (Reflecting)

2017

Giclee photograph on satin photo rag

Ed of 5.   600 x 899mm

Tūrua, Waihou Valley 2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5.   1020 x 1366 mm

Tūrua, Waihou Valley

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5.   1020 x 1366 mm

“The Tūrua forest between the lower Waihou and Piako rivers, in which kahikatea was the dominant tree, was almost entirely felled between 1865 and 1900. This stand of kahikatea in the Tūrua domain is one of the few which remain.” (1)

Photography has been seen as enabling a realm beyond natural vision, revealing visions previously unavailable to the human eye. Photographer Kate van der Drift similarly pictures what Walter Benjamin referred to as the “optical unconscious” (3). She does not snap to serve the heady aesthetics consumed by so many fans of trendy consumable landscape photography sold by the metre. Rather, these are careful depictions, truly shots of pure horror, of ghosts, of vanishing locations —stunning documents punching a forebodingly eerie warning.

Her lens is haunted.

van der Drift uses photography as a starting point for apparition. Given our ever increasing overexposure to photographic images (Instagram, Snapchat, Periscope, YouTube, Facebook… ) it could be argued we notice photography more. And less. Once photography was seen as embodying modernity and stillness. It is now more often characterised by its hustle and rapidity; so starkly that a myriad of image types have become globally accessible and hyper-real, at light-speed.

Roland Barthes proposed that the frozen temporality of a photograph has the effect of suggesting a past moment and that it’s therefore our belief in its reality which makes that moment permanently present (4). Van der Drift’s photographs create a powerful nostalgia, evoking the past within the present, but also cautioning the viewer of a potential future. Barthes further argued that the photograph acts as a “transparent envelope”, which we look through in order to engage with its content (5).

We are drawn to van der Drift’s images because of their physical properties, but also because of the potency she imbues into the subject. This unassuming quality allows van der Drift’s practice to adopt new forms and to insert itself into a wide variety of contexts. The invisibility of photography does not mark the end of the medium. van der Drift’s work instead evidences that the invisibility of photography is its very power.

The dominance of this form of perception engenders is also the context for Walter Benjamin’s discussion of ‘aura’ (6). What is significant about her images in this regard is the way in which their forms of interaction with the contemporary foreclose earlier (more auratic) modalities of experience. Van der Drift’s images favour closeness over distance. The sites she selects are auratic; her likenesses vibrational. This penetrates through and around her works: we sense colonists triggering havoc and fingerprinting an ignorantly destructive ascendancy over sacred nature - taonga tuku iho. This smarts against Māori culture in which the intergenerational protection of highly valued taonga, including whenua (land) is passed on from one generation to the next, in a caring and respectful manner.

In Aotearoa, mauri is the life force derived from whakapapa. It is the essential essence sustaining all forms of life and provides life and energy to all living and non-living things. Consider that if all plants, animals, water and soil possess mauri, then damage or contamination to the environment is therefore damage to, or loss of, mauri.

van der Drift alerts us to the insult migrant industrialisation is rapidly tossing at notions of kaitiakitanga (the stewardship or guardianship of the environment) and shows us the whenua being stripped and shredded into a disjointed carnage. Of course, digital practices mean that photography itself has become more disembodied, often exchanged from screen to screen without ever taking physical form. Yet, certain photographs are still noticed, embodied, displayed and examined as if they were personified - the still and printed image continues to be influential within contemporary art.

However, the apparently neutral documentation of spaces and places can be deceptive. Because van der Drift's practice involves photographing seemingly overlooked environments she takes dozens of digital photographs of the same location from different angles — yellowed paddocks, metal drains, water streaming across barren broken terrain— making drawings and studies of place. Settling on an angle, a compelling hook by which to slip the message onto the walls that matter, she then creates a large format film image. Finally, she plays with the pictorial —she fogs and manipulates these pictures until she succeeds in making her photographs read with an unequivocal peculiarity.

“Two of Waikato’s climatic features - heavy fog and frost…Both are common in winter, but some say the fogs are not as bad as they were when they were made denser by smoke from frequent peat fires, which were a common occurrence up until the 1970s”. (9)

van der Drift’s photographs are in fact elaborate handmade creations, painterly digitised workings. Her work brings together two opposing tendencies in the use of photographs by contemporary artists: the documentation of the everyday, and the creation of elaborate scenarios for the camera.

With the somatosensation of a watercolour artist, van der Drift consistently channels poetic visuality (10) to raise urgent questions.

I observed that a photograph can be the object of three practices (or of three emotions, or of three intentions): to do, to undergo, to look. The Operator is the Photographer. The Spectator is ourselves, all of us who glance through collections of photographs - in magazines and newspapers, in books, albums, archives... And the person or thing photographed is the target, the referent, a kind of little simulacrum, any eidolon emitted by the object, which I should like to call the Spectrum of the Photograph, because this word retains, through its root, a relation to "spectacle" and adds to it that rather terrible thing which is there in every photograph: the return of the dead. (11)

As a plant is ripped from the ground it releases the most exquisite scent: freshly plucked handfuls of mint, grass slashed with a blade, ahh. (Here, the plant is screeching an urgent olfactory distress signal to its nearest and dearest.) The fragrance we gleefully inhale is an indication of the utmost panic.  

 

By Maria Walls for 20/20 20 Artists and 20 Writers

 

Endnotes:

(1) Paul Monin, 'Hauraki–Coromandel places - Hauraki Plains', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/photograph/30633/kahikatea-stand(Accessed: 20/06/2017) 

(2) Augmented Reality / Virtual Reality / Mixed Reality

(3) Walter Benjamin, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’ (1936), in Illuminations, London: Fontana, 1973, pp. 243.

(4) Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, trans. Richard Howard, New York: Hill and Wang, 1981. pp. 76-80.

(5) Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, trans. Richard Howard, New York: Hill and Wang, 1981. p.5

(6) Walter Benjamin, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’ (1936), in Illuminations, London: Fontana, 1973, pp. 219-253.

(8) https://creators.vice.com/en_au/article/black-mist-burnt-country-jd-mittman-maralinga(Accessed: 20/06/2017)

(9) Nancy Swarbrick, 'Waikato region - Landscape and climate', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand  http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/photograph/27055/fog-and-frost(Accessed: 19/06/2017) 

(10) Thomas Carlyle coined the term “visuality” in 1841 as a response to what he saw as major changes in society, including the arrival of photography (Nicholas Mirzoeff, “On Visuality,” The Journal of Visual Culture 5, no.1 (2006): 53–79).

(11) Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, trans. Richard Howard, New York: Hill and Wang, 1981. p.9

(12) A play on the title of "New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape" an exhibition about a key moment in American landscape photography at the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House (Rochester, New York), 1976.

Refer: Jenkins, William. New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape. Catalogue. Rochester, NY: International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, 1975.

 

Kahikatea Study (Patetonga) I , 2017, graphite and watercolour paint on watercolour paper, 297mm x 210mm

Kahikatea Study (Patetonga) I ,

2017,

graphite and watercolour paint on watercolour paper,

297mm x 210mm

Kahikatea Study (Patetonga) II, 2017, graphite on watercolour paper, 210mm x 297mm

Kahikatea Study (Patetonga) II,

2017,

graphite on watercolour paper,

210mm x 297mm

Kahikatea Study (Patetonga) III, 2017, watercolour paint on watercolour paper, 210mm x 297mm

Kahikatea Study (Patetonga) III,

2017,

watercolour paint on watercolour paper,

210mm x 297mm

Window space Sanderson Contemporary Left: All Flourishing is Mutual by Paris Kirby.  Right Awaiti, Waihou Valley

Window space Sanderson Contemporary

Left: All Flourishing is Mutual by Paris Kirby.  Right Awaiti, Waihou Valley

Kate van der Drift

Sea of Echoes.

8 August – 27 August 2017

Cook had hoped to ride the ebb right down to the sea and the waiting Endeavour.  Night beat him.  But maybe, with fewer distractions in the landscape, I’ll make it.  Nothing signals that there is anything special here.  Yet a cultures most precious places are not necessarily visible to the eye.  Where English willows now hang in the mud, giant trees once governed the flatness, their dead leaves staining its rivers and streams dark, the air organic with their smells and the conversations of birds.[1]

Sea of Echoes is part of Kate van der Drift’s ongoing project investigating the layered past and ecology of the Hauraki Plains. In 1987 New Zealand writer and historian Geoff Park paddled up the Waihou River tracing the journey of the 1769 Endeavour party.  In 2017 van der Drift followed Parks journey, visiting the places he described in Ngā Uruora and imagining how the landscape had looked to Cook and Banks.  

The floodwater of the present day plains is tightly controlled by stopbanks, drains, canals, floodgates, culverts and pump-houses, ensuring the land that was once covered in water has every effort made to keep it as solid ground.  Few clues remain of the ancient fertile wetland.  Kahikatea forest fragments become island ruins, with birds travelling between them as stepping-stones to larger areas of bush.  Eventually other trees will replace these stands, the Kahikatea only flourishing with the space that water allows them.

In naming the Waihou River the ‘Thames’ Cook transformed the landscape into an object of European understanding.  A utopian moment for the British colonists, Joseph Banks asserted, “The River Thames is indeed in every respect the properest place we have yet seen for establishing a Colony.”[2] They knew the potential of draining such a floodplain and of the fertility of the soil lying beneath the water.  This is the place that defined Aotearoa/New Zealand’s colonial destiny.

Maria Walls discusses the invisibility of photography as the power within van der Drift’s work, further contextualising it within Walter Benjamin’s discussion of ‘aura’.  “What is significant about her images in this regard is the way in which their forms of interaction with the contemporary foreclose earlier (more auratic) modalities of experience. van der Drift’s images favour closeness over distance. The sites she selects are auratic; her likenesses vibrational. This penetrates through and around her works: we sense colonists triggering havoc and fingerprinting an ignorantly destructive ascendancy over sacred nature - taonga tuku iho.”[3] Her images are at times unsettling and haunted with loss.  van der Drift considers the way Pakeha imperialist culture has little ability to think holistically in regard to its impacts, “I wonder how people will look at their land and waterscapes in a century’s time and what they will show future cultures of our present environmental concerns, demands and aspirations.”[4]

Surface water within the images could be attributed to natural flooding, the anthropogenic impact of sea level rise or photographically manipulated. The water is a device, another layer for us to see through. “With the somatosensation of a watercolour artist, van der Drift consistently channels poetic visuality to raise urgent questions.”[5] The artist asks, are these scenes from the past, present or a potential future?

[1] Geoff Park, Nga Uruora (The Groves of Life). Victoria University Press, 1995, 20.

[2] Voyaging Accounts New Zealand (continued). Banks’s Descriptions of Places.  February 2004.  Accessed August 1, 2017 http://southseas.nla.gov.au/journals/banks_remarks/195.html

[3] Maria Walls, “Kate van der Drift” 20/20 20 Artists and 20 Writers Sanderson Contemporary 2017.

[4] Kate van der Drift, To See Know and Picture The Landscape. Accessed August 1, 2017 http:// http://katevanderdrift.com/to-see-know-and-picture-the-landscape

[5] Maria Walls, “Kate van der Drift” 20/20 20 Artists and 20 Writers Sanderson Contemporary 2017.

 

sea of echoes large install shot.jpg
sea of echoes install2.jpg
Kerepehi, Waihou Valley 2017 Giclee photograph on matte photo rag Ed of 5.   680x 850mm

Kerepehi, Waihou Valley

2017

Giclee photograph on matte photo rag

Ed of 5.   680x 850mm